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Old 03-22-2017, 04:49 PM   #1
gtowngovernor
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Question Manual Transmission Shifting Issue

Hi friends, I have noticed this weird thing happening with my car. I don't know if it is something that is expected with a stock clutch or if I am doing something wrong (or perhaps there is a defect).

I have a 2016 Golf R w/DCC, Manual Transmission, all stock. When I launch the car from 0 and want to take off fast, I usually push it to about 5K RPM and then up-shift, and so on. Now this is when weird things happen.

When I am at a high RPM range like on 3rd gear (lets say ~5500) and I super-quickly shift up and press back on the gas (all very fast), somehow the transmission does not adjust the RPMs down (to lets say ~4000) and keeps the RPM where it was on the previous gear. And if I keep pressing gas it will go beyond where I don't want it to go (6000+). I almost have to let go of the gas for a second (after shifting) for it to adjust back down and to bite the gear that I am on. Is this what "clutch slipping" is? And is it normal to happen when I am driving like a maniac? I kind of expected the car to be able to handle the power with all stock equipment.

Anyone else ever experience this? Any suggestions? If it is a defect, is it covered by the warranty?
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Old 03-22-2017, 04:53 PM   #2
BlueHen
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Generally, increased rpm's without increased power (and no loss of tire grip) is classic slippage.
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Old 03-22-2017, 05:07 PM   #3
todd92
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Remove the CDV, if you haven't already. If it's still doing it after, you've fried your clutch. Good luck getting that warrantied.
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Old 03-22-2017, 05:12 PM   #4
mr_blasto
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My understanding is that this is how the car is programmed to operate. People who have switch from a DMF to a SMF have noticed that the car may rev faster, but RPMs stay elevated briefly between gear shifts. Someone will correct me if I'm wrong, I'm sure, but my understanding is that your car is functioning normally and a different clutch or removal of the CDV won't change a thing.
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Old 03-22-2017, 05:22 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mr_blasto View Post
My understanding is that this is how the car is programmed to operate. People who have switch from a DMF to a SMF have noticed that the car may rev faster, but RPMs stay elevated briefly between gear shifts. Someone will correct me if I'm wrong, I'm sure, but my understanding is that your car is functioning normally and a different clutch or removal of the CDV won't change a thing.


It sounds like he's saying this happens AFTER he has removed his foot from the clutch entirely... if this is the case, his shit's toast.
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Old 03-22-2017, 05:33 PM   #6
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RPM hang with the clutch in and throttle off is a byproduct of flywheel inertia. Slow uptake of the clutch pedal after a rapid depress is a byproduct of the CDV + over center clutch helper spring.

A true test would be a high gear (4, 5 or 6) low RPM (2,500) + high load roll on throttle uphill. If the tach needle sweeps up at all with no road speed increase indication, the clutch is certainly slipping.
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Old 03-22-2017, 05:46 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by KLEEMANN1 View Post
RPM hang with the clutch in and throttle off is a byproduct of flywheel inertia. Slow uptake of the clutch pedal after a rapid depress is a byproduct of the CDV + over center clutch helper spring.

A true test would be a high gear (4, 5 or 6) low RPM (2,500) + high load roll on throttle uphill. If the tach needle sweeps up at all with no road speed increase indication, the clutch is certainly slipping.
Good catch. If that's what he's talking about, time to look at the clutch.
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Old 03-22-2017, 05:48 PM   #8
gtowngovernor
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Thank you everyone for the quick responses. I wanted to clarify something. This is not something that happens regularly. This only happens when I really really push the car to the limit. I still have lots of power in my clutch when I am not shifting. This only happens during a high rpm SHIFT and only SOMETIMES. I have never had the clutch slip if I am just pushing in the same gear (like from 2K - 5.5K) even on a high uphill (I'll try this test again - thanks KLEEMANN1). When people say it is fried or toast, wouldn't that mean that I would feel it every day?
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Old 03-22-2017, 05:58 PM   #9
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Do you smell burning clutch after it happens?
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Old 03-22-2017, 06:03 PM   #10
gtowngovernor
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Do you smell burning clutch after it happens?
No smell at all, the slippage happening is actually pretty subtle itself.
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Old 03-22-2017, 06:11 PM   #11
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Might just be rev hang from flywheel inertia as mentioned above. Then clutch doesn't grab fast enough to drop engine speed before you are back on the throttle. As other suggested, remove CDV and maybe helper spring if you haven't already.
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Old 03-22-2017, 06:27 PM   #12
gtowngovernor
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As other suggested, remove CDV and maybe helper spring if you haven't already.
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Originally Posted by todd92 View Post
Remove the CDV, if you haven't already. If it's still doing it after, you've fried your clutch. Good luck getting that warrantied.
Not to be a pain here, but ... I mean ... I am kind of a noob here and I am afraid to touch things I dont know things about. What are the pros / cons of removing this thing. Maybe it's worth it for me just to leave it as is? lol.

I appreciate you guys helping me out!
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Old 03-22-2017, 06:27 PM   #13
gtowngovernor
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Originally Posted by SomeDude View Post
Might just be rev hang from flywheel inertia as mentioned above. Then clutch doesn't grab fast enough to drop engine speed before you are back on the throttle. As other suggested, remove CDV and maybe helper spring if you haven't already.
It does sound awfully close to what actually is happening based on my feel.
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Old 03-22-2017, 06:28 PM   #14
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Not trying to be condescending, but rather save you time and dealer frustration...

If you aren't sure if it's slip, find a friend who knows cars well or even another forum enthusiast in the Bay Area, and have them drive your car.
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Old 03-22-2017, 06:30 PM   #15
gtowngovernor
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Originally Posted by BlueHen View Post
Not trying to be condescending, but rather save you time and dealer frustration...

If you aren't sure if it's slip, find a friend who knows cars well or even another forum enthusiast in the Bay Area, and have them drive your car.
Appreciate the honesty. Any volunteers in the Bay Area?
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Old 03-22-2017, 06:31 PM   #16
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Drive in 6th at 2000rpm, floor it and if the rpm's climb but you're not going faster then it's slipping.
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Old 03-22-2017, 06:35 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by gtowngovernor View Post
Not to be a pain here, but ... I mean ... I am kind of a noob here and I am afraid to touch things I dont know things about. What are the pros / cons of removing this thing. Maybe it's worth it for me just to leave it as is? lol.
Pros are more direct engagement of the clutch which will prolong the life of the clutch.

Cons are, in theory, it would create slightly more shock load on driveline components which would be absorbed by engine/trans mounts.

Only worth it to leave it as is if you want the symptoms to remain and/or get worse.
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