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What did you do to your mk7 today?

Acadia18

Autocross Champion
Location
Here the entire time
Car(s)
2019 Golf R
Yeah I have the short triple squares he has too but actually after I saw your like I was wishing I found those first lol.

Having the ability to stick an open end ratcheting wrench on those will be great for the super shitty access types of projects.

Damn.

That's definitely an element I didn't think of...

Back to Amazon?
 

EpicTech

Autocross Champion
Location
Houston
Car(s)
MK7 GTI 6sp w/PP
Long story short: Bought a CPO car that already had a tune on it but not yet flagged TD1. Dealership is mod-friendly and usually has no problem getting powertrain warranty work done on modded cars that haven't been abused. But they suggested I try the car without the tune and they would do everything they can to ensure any warranty issues that come up are covered (short of guaranteeing it). After much consideration, I decided to cover my butt for the short-term and flash back to stock for now, knowing it's easy to flash back the tune in the future. Overall, the stock car is great. It's fun to be able to hit it hard in 1st and 2nd gear and not just have pure wheelspin. Driving a slow car fast vs. driving a fast car slow, etc. etc. Buuuuut of course I want more power.

Understanding I'm not looking to infinitely upgrade my car to the max... Do I:
  1. Risk the powertrain warranty and add the APR tune back?
    • Pros:
      • It'll only cost me ~$250 for a bit of labor and to transfer the APR license, then I can flash any of the tune variations and the DSG tune.
      • Comprehensive, safe, high quality tune.
    • Cons:
      • The car is 2015 and I don't know that it has a revised turbo, so there's the risk that the turbo goes and I don't have a warranty to cover it.
      • You can't really mess around with the APR tunes.
      • I actually didn't like the APR DSG tune very much, so I might leave it off.
  2. Buy a used JB4 and play around with that until my CPO warranty is up?
    • Pros:
      • Inexpensive and easy (I regularly find them used for under $350)
      • Fun to tweak and mess around with settings.
      • I can tailor the power band in a way that limits low-RPM traction loss.
      • Can be taken off if there's an issue for warranty consideration.
    • Cons:
      • Not as powerful and smooth as a proper tune.
      • Used JB4 won't get the custom map support from George.
Simple answer: Do you want to have some fun, or a lot of fun ?

Me: I would (for a flash tune) switch to IE true flex. If you plan to build the car, get a scaling tuning platform like Cobb or Maestro.
 

mrmatto

Autocross Champion
Location
Jacksonville, FL
Car(s)
2024 GTI DSG
Simple answer: Do you want to have some fun, or a lot of fun ?

Me: I would (for a flash tune) switch to IE true flex. If you plan to build the car, get a scaling tuning platform like Cobb or Maestro.
Fun. I had the 93 octane high torque tune and it was too much power at times. Impossible to put the power down before 3rd gear. The APR low-torque/high-hp tune appeals to me greatly.

Going with a completely different tune isn't really a viable option for me because it's a much higher expense. No plans to build the car much either.
 

GTIfan99

Autocross Champion
Location
FL
Fun. I had the 93 octane high torque tune and it was too much power at times. Impossible to put the power down before 3rd gear. The APR low-torque/high-hp tune appeals to me greatly.

Going with a completely different tune isn't really a viable option for me because it's a much higher expense. No plans to build the car much either.

These cars are really good to start with. A stg 1 tune, rear sway bar, decent tires, and a good alignment yields a really capable car.

I will tell you from direct experience, if you decide to lower the car, bite the bullet an buy decent struts/shocks. The factory non DCC just collapse on themselves and bounce around even with a mild increase in rate and mild lowering.
 

Acadia18

Autocross Champion
Location
Here the entire time
Car(s)
2019 Golf R

StorableComa

Autocross Champion
Location
SoCal, USA
Car(s)
17 GSW S FWD
Got Moog endlinks in the mail. Greased them. Are they supposed to be very stiff?
Did you flush the green grease out of them? The boots will inflate and they have a relief slit in the side. If you're afraid it's going to burst try moving it side to side and it should open up the relief slit. There a little stiff at first, but not so bad you can't move the joints around by hand.
 

anotero

Autocross Champion
Location
Hither and thither
Car(s)
Mk7 GTI
Did you flush the green grease out of them? The boots will inflate and they have a relief slit in the side. If you're afraid it's going to burst try moving it side to side and it should open up the relief slit. There a little stiff at first, but not so bad you can't move the joints around by hand.

I can move the joints by hand. The thing is, the grease i'm using is also green. :) So can't really tell which grease it is that's coming out. The release valves are working fine, plus I'm using a non-pressurized hand grease gun, so not afraid to damage the boots.
 

StorableComa

Autocross Champion
Location
SoCal, USA
Car(s)
17 GSW S FWD
I can move the joints by hand. The thing is, the grease i'm using is also green. :) So can't really tell which grease it is that's coming out. The release valves are working fine, plus I'm using a non-pressurized hand grease gun, so not afraid to damage the boots.
So long as it's a heavy-duty lithium or synthetic grease you should be good to go then.
 

ckuhns

Autocross Champion
Location
Scotts Valley, CA
Car(s)
2019 Golf Sportwagen
Tried to install super pro control arms on my ‘19 Golf Sportwagen, only to find despite is supposedly being compatible, the OE ball joints don’t have long enough studs to get more than 2-3 threads of engagement… so not sure how I’m sorting that out in time for my alignment appointment Saturday..
C237297E-8761-41C4-84C9-506FE4DCCAB7.jpeg


I did however install a GTI Clubsport shifter!
264C9C4B-D9D4-4F10-8A41-3E5CBC540A0F.jpeg
 

Dog Dad Wagon

Autocross Champion
Location
Go Birds
Car(s)
16 Touareg TDI
Long story short: Bought a CPO car that already had a tune on it but not yet flagged TD1. Dealership is mod-friendly and usually has no problem getting powertrain warranty work done on modded cars that haven't been abused. But they suggested I try the car without the tune and they would do everything they can to ensure any warranty issues that come up are covered (short of guaranteeing it). After much consideration, I decided to cover my butt for the short-term and flash back to stock for now, knowing it's easy to flash back the tune in the future. Overall, the stock car is great. It's fun to be able to hit it hard in 1st and 2nd gear and not just have pure wheelspin. Driving a slow car fast vs. driving a fast car slow, etc. etc. Buuuuut of course I want more power.

Understanding I'm not looking to infinitely upgrade my car to the max... Do I:
  1. Risk the powertrain warranty and add the APR tune back?
    • Pros:
      • It'll only cost me ~$250 for a bit of labor and to transfer the APR license, then I can flash any of the tune variations and the DSG tune.
      • Comprehensive, safe, high quality tune.
    • Cons:
      • The car is 2015 and I don't know that it has a revised turbo, so there's the risk that the turbo goes and I don't have a warranty to cover it.
      • You can't really mess around with the APR tunes.
      • I actually didn't like the APR DSG tune very much, so I might leave it off.
  2. Buy a used JB4 and play around with that until my CPO warranty is up?
    • Pros:
      • Inexpensive and easy (I regularly find them used for under $350)
      • Fun to tweak and mess around with settings.
      • I can tailor the power band in a way that limits low-RPM traction loss.
      • Can be taken off if there's an issue for warranty consideration.
    • Cons:
      • Not as powerful and smooth as a proper tune.
      • Used JB4 won't get the custom map support from George.

If your 2015’s turbo hasn’t failed yet, You got one of the better ones. The bad ones went pop real early. What’s your build date? Anything in the actual year 2015 is better, since the “early build dates” were in 2014. 2015 was the 3rd year MK7s were out in the wild (3 in ROW, ~.5 years in NAR), and was the year they addressed the vast majority of initial build quality issues. (Turbo, injectors, some other things I can’t remember since it’s been 6 years).

Imo since your car is already TD1’d there’s very, very little benefit to running a “stock tune” - as it’s not actually the stock tune. It’s reverse engineered to mimic the stock tune. Aka there’s no real difference between your “stock tune” and the APR tune, besides the extra power.

you could do the following:
1. Get a JB4, run it until Tax Return next year (or following year, whenever your warranty is up).
2. Sell JB4, recoup 90-100% of cost. go APR Low Torque 91, and run 93. The engine will never pull timing, even in 110 degrees with 100% humidity provided your valves aren’t caked and the injectors aren’t stuck and the coils aren’t shot and the plugs aren’t fouled. This is my general perspective. Run 91 tune on 93, enjoy optimal performance in all conditions, even on stock hardware w/o Intercooler.
3. Profit
 
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Dog Dad Wagon

Autocross Champion
Location
Go Birds
Car(s)
16 Touareg TDI
My main complaint was APR DSG tune was very aggressive with downshifting when I was coming to a stop, even in D mode. It made it hard to just cruise around smoothly. The shift points were better though, for sure, and I liked that launch control allowed traction control to be on.

This is more a matter of getting used to the brake pedal modulation with deceleration on a DSG car. Even stock DSG tunes utilize downshifting to relieve effort from the brakes, which consequently means the same amount of braking force (foot held at constant position on brake) equals variable amounts of stopping power, between downshifts. This is just a driver’s learning curve for someone who has never owned a VW DSG. My last car, a 2015 GTI went to 95K miles on factory pads and rotors because I utilized the DSG engine braking soooooooooooooo much.

If you like the shift points more, I would suggest going back to APR TCU and just focusing on learning the brake pedal modulation. I think you’d realize just how bad the stock TCU is if/when you get used to the brake modulation. I couldn’t effin STAND the DSG on my 2015 GTI. I liked the stock tune on my previous 2011 CC DSG far more than the one on my 2015 GTI. I liked it even more than the GTI‘s Unitronic TCU tune.
 

mrmatto

Autocross Champion
Location
Jacksonville, FL
Car(s)
2024 GTI DSG
This is more a matter of getting used to the brake pedal modulation with deceleration on a DSG car. Even stock DSG tunes utilize downshifting to relieve effort from the brakes, which consequently means the same amount of braking force (foot held at constant position on brake) equals variable amounts of stopping power, between downshifts. This is just a driver’s learning curve for someone who has never owned a VW DSG. My last car, a 2015 GTI went to 95K miles on factory pads and rotors because I utilized the DSG engine braking soooooooooooooo much.

If you like the shift points more, I would suggest going back to APR TCU and just focusing on learning the brake pedal modulation. I think you’d realize just how bad the stock TCU is if/when you get used to the brake modulation. I couldn’t effin STAND the DSG on my 2015 GTI. I liked the stock tune on my previous 2011 CC DSG far more than the one on my 2015 GTI. I liked it even more than the GTI‘s Unitronic TCU tune.
Ah yes, the knee-jerk reaction to blame the driver. It's not like the issue exists with the stock TCU and I'm just dummy who can't get used to it. The downshifting behavior is much different in the stock TCU -- it's much smoother and less jerky. I have NO PROBLEM with engine braking and use it often when in manual mode. But when I'm in D mode, the car should drive smoothly, and it doesn't with the APR TCU tune.
 
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