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The COVID19 SCAMdemic... Normal People Olympics - Joe Is Sick - Recycle Like Willem Dafoe

cb1111

Newbie
Location
Virginia, USA
This is true, and playing the piggy in a stick house, our power outages happen as a result of downed local distribution lines. Since we moved to the more boujie side of things, our lines from the substation to home are all subterranean. We’ve had only a couple outages in 4yrs and they were back up within an hour. Not saying it can’t happen, just less likely.... but who knows, maybe our windmills will freeze??!?! 🤪

Thankfully our infrastructure is better equipped to handle cold events than Texas, and understandably so. So I don’t see what happened there occurring here. If it does, we’ll get the plumbing winterized quick, toss on some layers, and go hang at my parent’s place that can run off grid if needed.

To my understanding, Texas happened because their infrastructure was not able to function that far below freezing. The natural gas was there to use. It’s the power going down from low temps that crippled the ability to distribute it (pumping/switching stations), and to make use of it (furnaces etc).

We have two fireplaces in the house; gas on main level, wood burning in basement. Our issue is the ability to distribute the heat throughout the remainder of the house. A generator could keep the HVAC fan turning.

You seem to be more well versed in emergency planning, so if you have any “what abouts” I’m all ears.
That's my life. We learn from every disaster. While underground lines reduce outages in your area, they don't resolve the issue of exploding transformers and downed transmission lines (to your subdivision). Here's what I would do (did) - not directed at you specifically.

Determine the threats, risks and my own needs. I spoke earlier about my need for constant power due to my dad's illness - does your family have any special needs?
What are the expected threats in your region? Are they seasonal? (need for heat in winter trumps need for AC in summer for most people) (damn, did I use the word "trumps"? - sorry)
What unexpected events could affect your house? For example, this storm showed us how adding cheap insulation to all water pipes can save a home and all the things in it.
How long are the expected events going to last? How long can you exist right now without those services?
And so forth. Prioritize your threats and see what easy fixes are available.

Specifically for things like power, food and water.

I love my Generac. I'll never have a house without a generator. You need to decide if you want the generator to run only some things or everything in the house. My generator can run everything except really constant high draw things - oven, geothermal supplemental heat etc. (the supplemental heat will add heat to get the house to a cozy mid 70's regardless of outside temps. It is expensive and has never gone on while we've been here. If the regular geo can only get me up to the low 60's because it is so cold outside then I'll put on a sweater, but the geo will keep things from freezing or people dying from hypothermia in the house. The generac takes a few seconds to kick in, but aside from that, you'll never know you're running on a generator.

Water - everybody needs at least three cases of water per person kept somewhere in the house (and rotated as necessary), or a watercooler with at least two 5 gallon bottles per person. Even if you are on city water, you'll want to plan for outages and you need to flush toilets so get a proper plug for your bathtub or cover the drain liberally with duct tape and fill up your bathtub with water when severe weather is expected. If you have more than one bathtub, then fill one and put a plastic sheet over it - that's the one you use for water for cooking and so forth. The other tub is used for flushing toilets, washing etc. (personal hygiene is important to keep from getting sick) scoop out a pot of water, heat it and wash from there.

Food - stock up on non-perishables and stuff that doesn't need to be refrigerator or cooked - tuna, mayo (lots of mayo), sardines, crackers, cookies, cereal, canned soups (you can eat them cold too), chef boyardee type stuff - anything that keeps and you could eat cold. Figure about two weeks worth for everyone in the house. Use the perishables first of course and make sure that you keep stuff for picky eaters.

Meds - keep a month's supply for everybody. Make sure tat you have a copy of every prescription. Even if you don't regularly take vitamin supplements, get some for every member of the family and start taking them if the lights go out as your diet during a disaster may not be balanced. Eat plenty of fiber - I can tell you a story about Katrina, MRE's and the convention center one of these days.

Will you get sick and tired of eating tuna, crackers and beef jerky? Probably, but your family will survive without most disasters of this type without issues - and you can go and get Taco Bell when it is all over.

Don't forget to do the same for your pets. Spend a week and measure the amount of water you give your pets and factor that in - you'll be surprised at the amount of water they drink. Even if they normally eat wet food, get a bag of dry food and keep it as a backup. If they take meds, then keep a supply of that too. The last thing you need in a disaster is to worry about getting meds for somebody - human or pet.

Include non electric toys, games, puzzles and other distractions for kids (and pets). Books for adults.

Make a go-kit for everyone in your family. www.ready.gov has some good information about what you might need.

Should I go on? Your personal planning should be that you'll be on your own for about a week to ten days,

Oh, and to Golfy - the same applies to Europe and the UK. The threats may be different depending on location but the threats are there.
 

zrickety

The Fixer
Location
Unknown
Car(s)
VW GTI
Damn. Gonna be a cold ass day, radiator job on an a3 then suspension on a golf r 🥶
Sucks. I always hated working in the frozen tundra. We'll hit low 50's here today, sunny, I'm parting out what's good under the hood of the money pit...aka the Mini Cooper.
 

Allchokedup

Autocross Champion
Location
Dallas
This is true, and playing the piggy in a stick house, our power outages happen as a result of downed local distribution lines. Since we moved to the more boujie side of things, our lines from the substation to home are all subterranean. We’ve had only a couple outages in 4yrs and they were back up within an hour. Not saying it can’t happen, just less likely.... but who knows, maybe our windmills will freeze??!?! 🤪

Thankfully our infrastructure is better equipped to handle cold events than Texas, and understandably so. So I don’t see what happened there occurring here. If it does, we’ll get the plumbing winterized quick, toss on some layers, and go hang at my parent’s place that can run off grid if needed.

To my understanding, Texas happened because their infrastructure was not able to function that far below freezing. The natural gas was there to use. It’s the power going down from low temps that crippled the ability to distribute it (pumping/switching stations), and to make use of it (furnaces etc).

We have two fireplaces in the house; gas on main level, wood burning in basement. Our issue is the ability to distribute the heat throughout the remainder of the house. A generator could keep the HVAC fan turning.

You seem to be more well versed in emergency planning, so if you have any “what abouts” I’m all ears.

My friends house runs off of propane. His electric was on but the regulator OR the tanks got so cold they lost pressure. He was in his shop with a propane grill cooking steaks. Once the small tanks got warm they kept them warm.
Moral to the story..always be prepared.
I have life straws to drink any water except salt. Keep firewood on hand and hopefully all cars filled with gas(can siphon for generator)
At the end of the day you can't rely on someone else to keep you alive.
Oh and guns and ammo. Lots of guns and even more ammo. A good pellet gun is nice to have also to take small game if you can't afford a lot of ammo. If you can make snare traps even better.
Do your homework before you're up shit creek.
 

Allchokedup

Autocross Champion
Location
Dallas
That's my life. We learn from every disaster. While underground lines reduce outages in your area, they don't resolve the issue of exploding transformers and downed transmission lines (to your subdivision). Here's what I would do (did) - not directed at you specifically.

Determine the threats, risks and my own needs. I spoke earlier about my need for constant power due to my dad's illness - does your family have any special needs?
What are the expected threats in your region? Are they seasonal? (need for heat in winter trumps need for AC in summer for most people) (damn, did I use the word "trumps"? - sorry)
What unexpected events could affect your house? For example, this storm showed us how adding cheap insulation to all water pipes can save a home and all the things in it.
How long are the expected events going to last? How long can you exist right now without those services?
And so forth. Prioritize your threats and see what easy fixes are available.

Specifically for things like power, food and water.

I love my Generac. I'll never have a house without a generator. You need to decide if you want the generator to run only some things or everything in the house. My generator can run everything except really constant high draw things - oven, geothermal supplemental heat etc. (the supplemental heat will add heat to get the house to a cozy mid 70's regardless of outside temps. It is expensive and has never gone on while we've been here. If the regular geo can only get me up to the low 60's because it is so cold outside then I'll put on a sweater, but the geo will keep things from freezing or people dying from hypothermia in the house. The generac takes a few seconds to kick in, but aside from that, you'll never know you're running on a generator.

Water - everybody needs at least three cases of water per person kept somewhere in the house (and rotated as necessary), or a watercooler with at least two 5 gallon bottles per person. Even if you are on city water, you'll want to plan for outages and you need to flush toilets so get a proper plug for your bathtub or cover the drain liberally with duct tape and fill up your bathtub with water when severe weather is expected. If you have more than one bathtub, then fill one and put a plastic sheet over it - that's the one you use for water for cooking and so forth. The other tub is used for flushing toilets, washing etc. (personal hygiene is important to keep from getting sick) scoop out a pot of water, heat it and wash from there.

Food - stock up on non-perishables and stuff that doesn't need to be refrigerator or cooked - tuna, mayo (lots of mayo), sardines, crackers, cookies, cereal, canned soups (you can eat them cold too), chef boyardee type stuff - anything that keeps and you could eat cold. Figure about two weeks worth for everyone in the house. Use the perishables first of course and make sure that you keep stuff for picky eaters.

Meds - keep a month's supply for everybody. Make sure tat you have a copy of every prescription. Even if you don't regularly take vitamin supplements, get some for every member of the family and start taking them if the lights go out as your diet during a disaster may not be balanced. Eat plenty of fiber - I can tell you a story about Katrina, MRE's and the convention center one of these days.

Will you get sick and tired of eating tuna, crackers and beef jerky? Probably, but your family will survive without most disasters of this type without issues - and you can go and get Taco Bell when it is all over.

Don't forget to do the same for your pets. Spend a week and measure the amount of water you give your pets and factor that in - you'll be surprised at the amount of water they drink. Even if they normally eat wet food, get a bag of dry food and keep it as a backup. If they take meds, then keep a supply of that too. The last thing you need in a disaster is to worry about getting meds for somebody - human or pet.

Include non electric toys, games, puzzles and other distractions for kids (and pets). Books for adults.

Make a go-kit for everyone in your family. www.ready.gov has some good information about what you might need.

Should I go on? Your personal planning should be that you'll be on your own for about a week to ten days,

Oh, and to Golfy - the same applies to Europe and the UK. The threats may be different depending on location but the threats are there.
Cases of water is good but a long term sustainable plan is better. We have a pond and a creek on our property.
A way to purify water is best(iodine). You can always find water
 

zrickety

The Fixer
Location
Unknown
Car(s)
VW GTI
The people experiencing racism are stupid for wanting to stop racism and I'm virtue signaling, because I want them to be treated equally too?

That's how racists think.

And AGAIN, what sex are people both with both genitalia, biologically speaking, since you believe gender is a function of genitalia.
Biologically speaking, they are mutants. Gender and genitalia go hand in hand, this is not a 'belief' this has been a medical fact since your ancestors lived in caves.
The first 'sex change' was in 1910 by a German scientist. 'Transsexual' appeared in 1949, 'transgender' in 1971. It has been a fringe group until recently.
 

uglybastard

Autocross Champion
Location
GOML
Car(s)
Mk6 GTI
Damn. Gonna be a cold ass day, radiator job on an a3 then suspension on a golf r 🥶
sounds like a cool job, on a few levels...
 

uglybastard

Autocross Champion
Location
GOML
Car(s)
Mk6 GTI
That's my life. We learn from every disaster. While underground lines reduce outages in your area, they don't resolve the issue of exploding transformers and downed transmission lines (to your subdivision). Here's what I would do (did) - not directed at you specifically.

Determine the threats, risks and my own needs. I spoke earlier about my need for constant power due to my dad's illness - does your family have any special needs?
What are the expected threats in your region? Are they seasonal? (need for heat in winter trumps need for AC in summer for most people) (damn, did I use the word "trumps"? - sorry)
What unexpected events could affect your house? For example, this storm showed us how adding cheap insulation to all water pipes can save a home and all the things in it.
How long are the expected events going to last? How long can you exist right now without those services?
And so forth. Prioritize your threats and see what easy fixes are available.

Specifically for things like power, food and water.

I love my Generac. I'll never have a house without a generator. You need to decide if you want the generator to run only some things or everything in the house. My generator can run everything except really constant high draw things - oven, geothermal supplemental heat etc. (the supplemental heat will add heat to get the house to a cozy mid 70's regardless of outside temps. It is expensive and has never gone on while we've been here. If the regular geo can only get me up to the low 60's because it is so cold outside then I'll put on a sweater, but the geo will keep things from freezing or people dying from hypothermia in the house. The generac takes a few seconds to kick in, but aside from that, you'll never know you're running on a generator.

Water - everybody needs at least three cases of water per person kept somewhere in the house (and rotated as necessary), or a watercooler with at least two 5 gallon bottles per person. Even if you are on city water, you'll want to plan for outages and you need to flush toilets so get a proper plug for your bathtub or cover the drain liberally with duct tape and fill up your bathtub with water when severe weather is expected. If you have more than one bathtub, then fill one and put a plastic sheet over it - that's the one you use for water for cooking and so forth. The other tub is used for flushing toilets, washing etc. (personal hygiene is important to keep from getting sick) scoop out a pot of water, heat it and wash from there.

Food - stock up on non-perishables and stuff that doesn't need to be refrigerator or cooked - tuna, mayo (lots of mayo), sardines, crackers, cookies, cereal, canned soups (you can eat them cold too), chef boyardee type stuff - anything that keeps and you could eat cold. Figure about two weeks worth for everyone in the house. Use the perishables first of course and make sure that you keep stuff for picky eaters.

Meds - keep a month's supply for everybody. Make sure tat you have a copy of every prescription. Even if you don't regularly take vitamin supplements, get some for every member of the family and start taking them if the lights go out as your diet during a disaster may not be balanced. Eat plenty of fiber - I can tell you a story about Katrina, MRE's and the convention center one of these days.

Will you get sick and tired of eating tuna, crackers and beef jerky? Probably, but your family will survive without most disasters of this type without issues - and you can go and get Taco Bell when it is all over.

Don't forget to do the same for your pets. Spend a week and measure the amount of water you give your pets and factor that in - you'll be surprised at the amount of water they drink. Even if they normally eat wet food, get a bag of dry food and keep it as a backup. If they take meds, then keep a supply of that too. The last thing you need in a disaster is to worry about getting meds for somebody - human or pet.

Include non electric toys, games, puzzles and other distractions for kids (and pets). Books for adults.

Make a go-kit for everyone in your family. www.ready.gov has some good information about what you might need.

Should I go on? Your personal planning should be that you'll be on your own for about a week to ten days,

Oh, and to Golfy - the same applies to Europe and the UK. The threats may be different depending on location but the threats are there.
is there a TDLR version of this
 

zrickety

The Fixer
Location
Unknown
Car(s)
VW GTI

zrickety

The Fixer
Location
Unknown
Car(s)
VW GTI
2020 is one big advert for that lifestyle. everyone will have a bunker and or a compound...
If things really get that bad, I'd rather transition to the afterlife. I don't think it will come to that.
 

zrickety

The Fixer
Location
Unknown
Car(s)
VW GTI
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