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recommend engine fault code scanner

jimlloyd40

Autocross Champion
Location
Phoenix
Car(s)
2018 SE DSG
Let's close the loop for the OP

If you only want to clear most codes, then any generic reader is fine.

If you also want to tweak some settings (and there are very many settings to tweak) then get an OBD11 or VCDS
Or Carista. I used Carista for just one week for $10. Made all the changes I wanted to and was done. Already have other ways to read and clear codes.
 

Cuzoe

Autocross Newbie
Location
Los Angeles
I might also throw in that if you're making any coding changes (not just viewing and/or clearing fault codes) you should take a backup of your un-touched coding. This is easy with VCDS and I assume it's possible with OBD11 but I don't know.

This is particularly true if you are going to use the 1-touch apps to make changes. Unless things have changed recently the 1-touch apps don't explicitly tell you or record the changes that are being made. If something in the 1-touch app doesn't jive with your car you could end up with a different result from what you were trying to accomplish. Nothing that would cause any real problems I would think but they could be annoying to chase down.
 

TheMechanicDude

Go Kart Champion
Location
Fl
Car(s)
17 GTI Sport
You said "vcds was too expensive"

I said "it's $200"

What don't you understand?

I guess I could explicitly state that $200 is quite a fair price for something so powerful, but did I really need to?
Obviously our definitions of expensive differ and no issue understanding here. In case you don’t understand me an average user who will maybe use 15% of its capabilities it’s $$$.
Things are only “powerful” if the user can use it IMO . Took me some time once I got the cable. I find most forums users don’t have time to search for oil types and so I’d say it’s safe to assume they’re not wanting to look up how to long code.



Also in response to the pay for apps. I’m from the days when one person in the tri county had VCDS and would charge $15 to code at GTG’s. If that user wasn’t good (there are tons of idiots) they could brick your ECU. Forums where new and help was scarce. I understand it’s not as intimidating now a days.
 

cb1111

Newbie
Location
Virginia, USA
Obviously our definitions of expensive differ and no issue understanding here. In case you don’t understand me an average user who will maybe use 15% of its capabilities it’s $$$.
Things are only “powerful” if the user can use it IMO . Took me some time once I got the cable. I find most forums users don’t have time to search for oil types and so I’d say it’s safe to assume they’re not wanting to look up how to long code.



Also in response to the pay for apps. I’m from the days when one person in the tri county had VCDS and would charge $15 to code at GTG’s. If that user wasn’t good (there are tons of idiots) they could brick your ECU. Forums where new and help was scarce. I understand it’s not as intimidating now a days.
I started with ProDIAG from Shadetree back in 2002/2003 with my S6, then switched to VAG-COM (now VCDS) with my first modern GTI in 2006ish. ProDIAG ran on the Palm OS platform on my Kyocera 6035 - so, similar to how OBD11 works on Android. VCDS is just so much more powerful and has a far better backup system than OBD11.

Pricing - while OBD11 has no VIN limitations, the "propack" is $167 while VCDS is $199 for the 3 VIN limited version. How many VINs do you really need? I have two Alltracks, do I need unlimited VINs? I can clear as many codes as I like on as many cars as I like and make some changes to any VAG car.
 
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