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Loud "pothole impact" sound over bumps normal?

jphughan

New member
Location
Austin, TX
Hello all,

First I will say that I have already checked for suspension pucks that had been left installed, and thankfully there were none. Photos of the inside of the plastic "sleeves" show everything clear up to a yellow foamy looking thing that appears to be permanently stuck to the body.

I got a 2019 Golf R w/ DCC+DSG a few months ago and I'm loving it. There's only one thing that concerns me a bit, hence this thread. Where I live, there's a stretch of road that drops off a bit for a railroad track crossing, and then there's a good-sized bump on the far side of those tracks where the regular road resumes. In my wife's 2015 Honda Civic and my 2016 Porsche Cayman GT4, I can cross over that stretch at 45+ MPH and it's not an issue at all. When I first did that with the Golf, there was a very loud "wham/smack" noise that permeated the cabin, loud enough to make me worry that something had been damaged. It's the sound you might hear when dropping into a very deep pothole. I've found that I basically have to cross that stretch at no more than 30 MPH to avoid triggering that worrisome noise.

To be clear, I'm not complaining here. If some aspect of this car's suspension and/or chassis design means it's normal for it to need to be taken across bumps at noticeably lower speeds than other cars to avoid this, then I'm perfectly happy to do that. It just seems strange to me that a regular Civic that's set up to be softer than the Golf R and a Cayman GT4 that's set up to be more aggressive than the Golf R would both be fine running across this stretch of road at higher speeds, whereas the Golf R makes this loud noise, so I wanted to see if others had noticed this just to reassure me that there isn't something wrong with my specific example.

Thanks for taking the time to read this.
 

jphughan

New member
Location
Austin, TX
Thanks! That's my guess too. I'm just wondering if that's easier to do in this car compared to others or if there might be something wrong with my car that might be making it easier than it should be. This is my first VW, so I don't even have a frame of reference for the brand. The car does feel fine otherwise though.
 

jphughan

New member
Location
Austin, TX
Just take it slow. The Golf-R is more like a sports car.
I realize that, in fact I'm an HPDE instructor. But as I said, my Cayman GT4 that is an actual sports car optimized for the track is perfectly fine over this same bump at higher speeds, hence my confusion. I realize it's also more expensive and therefore the difference might be down to just having a more exotic suspension setup that's both more capable from a performance standpoint AND more compliant on the road -- in fact I've been amazed at just how livable the GT4 is on the road -- but again this was just very unexpected, so I wanted to find out if other owners had had this experience or if it might something up with my own car.
 

jimlloyd40

Autocross Champion
Location
Phoenix
Car(s)
2018 SE DSG
I haven't seen others post anything about this but I can understand your concern especially when the Cayman doesn't bottom out at the same place.
 

KevinC

Autocross Newbie
Location
Cochise County, AZ
Car(s)
'19 Golf R, '08 Z4MC
Surprised nobody has mentioned the shipping pucks - might not have been removed during PDI, seems to happen a LOT. Search for more info and have a look and see if that might be the problem.
 

JC_451

Autocross Newbie
Location
NJ
Car(s)
2017 GTI Sport
Surprised nobody has mentioned the shipping pucks - might not have been removed during PDI, seems to happen a LOT. Search for more info and have a look and see if that might be the problem.
The OP mentions he checked for them...its like the second line. ?
 

goodvibes

Go Kart Newbie
Location
IL
I'm not familiar with the R active shocks but I'd try different settings on approach and see if sport helps. That said, when my alltrack was on stock suspension, it never bottomed out but it once did make a very loud bang at low speed when a wheel went full down excursion in a drop off due to woefully poor rebound damping. Thought the chassis hit something I wasn't aware of but it was the suspension going full excursion too quickly.
 

ZERO815

Go Kart Newbie
Location
Köln Germany
Car(s)
NA '17 GTI SE DSG
Does it „wham“ in all dcc modes?
 

The Fed

Old Guys Rule
Location
Florida
The R is is much less compliant. I was amazed how fast I could take speed bumps in my MK5. I have to virtually stop for them in my R.
 

josh_

Passed Driver's Ed
Location
Moraga, CA
Yo,

When I first got my R I was also pretty taken back when I went across bumps or separations in the highway. I would describe it just like you said. Like "wholly crap did I just send my shock through the the top hat" loud. Jarring also. As others have eluded to, it is a "feature" for the Golf R suspension. It will do it in "Comfort" mode as well.

If you have 19" wheels, that won't help either. FWIW, I own an '18 STi now, and it rolls across the same roads without an issue. On 19" wheels. So your comparison to the other cars is sound. It really is just the way the car drives.

Best,
josh
 

ayao

New member
Location
CA
Hello all,

First I will say that I have already checked for suspension pucks that had been left installed, and thankfully there were none. Photos of the inside of the plastic "sleeves" show everything clear up to a yellow foamy looking thing that appears to be permanently stuck to the body.

I got a 2019 Golf R w/ DCC+DSG a few months ago and I'm loving it. There's only one thing that concerns me a bit, hence this thread. Where I live, there's a stretch of road that drops off a bit for a railroad track crossing, and then there's a good-sized bump on the far side of those tracks where the regular road resumes. In my wife's 2015 Honda Civic and my 2016 Porsche Cayman GT4, I can cross over that stretch at 45+ MPH and it's not an issue at all. When I first did that with the Golf, there was a very loud "wham/smack" noise that permeated the cabin, loud enough to make me worry that something had been damaged. It's the sound you might hear when dropping into a very deep pothole. I've found that I basically have to cross that stretch at no more than 30 MPH to avoid triggering that worrisome noise.

To be clear, I'm not complaining here. If some aspect of this car's suspension and/or chassis design means it's normal for it to need to be taken across bumps at noticeably lower speeds than other cars to avoid this, then I'm perfectly happy to do that. It just seems strange to me that a regular Civic that's set up to be softer than the Golf R and a Cayman GT4 that's set up to be more aggressive than the Golf R would both be fine running across this stretch of road at higher speeds, whereas the Golf R makes this loud noise, so I wanted to see if others had noticed this just to reassure me that there isn't something wrong with my specific example.

Thanks for taking the time to read this.
My R (‘17) does this as well. Impacts that all my other cars shake off seem to be noticeably less dampened in the R.
There is one particular recessed manhole cover on a 35 mph road nearby that in the R creates an impact that sounds terrifying. (“Something must have broken this time FOR SURE...”) In my other cars this same manhole cover hole results in a noticeable impact but the hit is dampened in a way that doesn’t make you feel that something was damaged.
I am looking forward to Apex releasing some hubcentric 18” wheels this year so that I can try to get a little more aspect ratio on the tires to reduce the terror of these road hazards, even though I’m so fond of the look of the 19” Pretorias.
 
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