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Interesting Video on Winter/Summer/All Season

CMARNOLD78

Ready to race!
Location
DC
This guy does the best reviews on tires. Really interesting one on the temperature performance changes in wet/dry on the different types of tires. He also uses a Golf for most of his tests.

 

demi9od

Go Kart Champion
Location
NC
Been looking for this data forever, awesome someone finally tested it. I've left my summers on so far this winter as it's barely gotten down to freezing, but wow they sure are dangerous in the wet.
 

gti330ex

Ready to race!
Location
Chicagoland
Close to an ultimate tire review. These guys are doing a great job and thanks OP for posting this!

I'm surprised to see the little gap a hardcore winter tire makes on the packaged snow over the other winter (performance?) tire and the two all seasons. Could this be due packaged and possibly artificial snow?

And for all those hardcore street racers out there with their upgraded summer rubber trashing A/S tire as a no season tire ... okay! LOL

The real question is, how would Blizzak WS80, Michelin Xi3, Continental WinterContact Si for example compare to these Hakka R3's in the wet and dry braking? I'd assume these studless winter tires in US would fall within the "nordic" category whereas the "winter" category from this video would represent a performance winter tire. C&D tested studless winter competition (Hakka R2, Xice3, Si, WS80) back in '15 .. https://www.caranddriver.com/features/a15102773/best-snow-tires-for-winter/

So unless you're running performance oriented winter tires or the awesome all-seasons (like OEM p7s :)), you can find yourself in far worse position in wet and/or dry on a hardcore studless/nordic winter tire vs summer rubber.


Been looking for this data forever, awesome someone finally tested it. I've left my summers on so far this winter as it's barely gotten down to freezing, but wow they sure are dangerous in the wet.
Not any more dangerous in wet than a traditional/hardcore non-studded winter tire.
 
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golfdave

Drag Racing Champion
Location
Scotland (U.K.)
Ride
MK7 Golf GT Estate
Easy way to look at "all season/winter" tyres is the two separate key standards...

3MPS...a symbol with a snowflake inside a mountain with 3 peaks.....basically these tyres meet the minimum requirements for the various countries which demand a winter tyre for certain months....usually these have a compound with more silica in them to remain flexible at low temps...also the tread usually has more snipes or fine cuts to grip on glossy smooth surfaces like black ice.

M+S. writing....Mud & snow tyre...this has nothing to do with above & can be a tyre with a normal rubber compound.....however the tread is designed to clear snow & mud easy.....
 
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victorofhavoc

Ready to race!
Location
Kansas City
Close to an ultimate tire review. These guys are doing a great job and thanks OP for posting this!

I'm surprised to see the little gap a hardcore winter tire makes on the packaged snow over the other winter (performance?) tire and the two all seasons. Could this be due packaged and possibly artificial snow?

And for all those hardcore street racers out there with their upgraded summer rubber trashing A/S tire as a no season tire ... okay! LOL

The real question is, how would Blizzak WS80, Michelin Xi3, Continental WinterContact Si for example compare to these Hakka R3's in the wet and dry braking? I'd assume these studless winter tires in US would fall within the "nordic" category whereas the "winter" category from this video would represent a performance winter tire. C&D tested studless winter competition (Hakka R2, Xice3, Si, WS80) back in '15 .. https://www.caranddriver.com/features/a15102773/best-snow-tires-for-winter/

So unless you're running performance oriented winter tires or the awesome all-seasons (like OEM p7s :)), you can find yourself in far worse position in wet and/or dry on a hardcore studless/nordic winter tire vs summer rubber.




Not any more dangerous in wet than a traditional/hardcore non-studded winter tire.
The guy in the video made a mention of how you can't judge solely based on those numbers, and there's an element of feel to take into account. If you live somewhere where it's very wet, slushy, icy during winter, the true winter tires do hold an advantage in feel and response, while the *good* all seasons come close, but won't feel as stable. As soon as you're driving on snow/ice though, the winter tires are always far more stable feeling, so that WHEN you start to slide through a corner, it's progressive and easy to control (fun) vs panicking and fighting to regain control.

I've driven through numerous blizzards, ice storms, and more often than anything else: "slushy wintery mix" because that's what we mostly get in the i70 belt. I much prefer the feel of a winter tire during winter in almost all conditions below 40 degree road temp, especially when it's damp out and we're getting wind chills of -10. I've seen so many bromobiles in my area running an offroad tire of some variety and flying at 70mph on a snowpacked interstate. I also often see them a few minutes later stuck on the side of the road. No matter your tire, driving to the road conditions and your tire is the most important part...
 
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