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How the VW Golf GTI Performance Pack (PP) “Front Differential Lock” (VAQ) works.

golfdave

Drag Racing Champion
Location
Scotland (U.K.)
Ride
MK7 Golf GT Estate
Why do this?
Although there is masses of information out there on this unit, most of it uses what little there is from the VAG press releases. This usually goes as detailed as “the pump unit pressurises oil into the clutch pack to activate the diff”. This leaves out huge amounts of electrical & mechanical information about the unit & how it uses the other systems on the car. Having thoroughly researched this I aim to address these issues in this “How it works” guide.

Acknowledgements.
Some of the information is from the official VW workshop manuals, & self study guides which I purchased from ERWIN. Other information is from Seat Sport re their MQB platform, Leon Cup Racer TCR car. I also gained information from Borg Warner re a thesis on their “FXD” unit. I have also looked at all the numerous videos & web info. which has been released by the VAG marketing depts..

Problems with the nomenclature
Borg Warner who are the manufacturers of the unit, call it “Front Cross Differential Technology”, or “FXD”.

ERWIN, which is the official VAG workshop manuals, call it a “Front Differential Lock”, & in the “Self study guides” they also refer to it as an “Electrohydraulic Front Differential Lock”.

VAG HQ in Germany, call it “Vorderachsquersperre” (VAQ), which translated from German to English means “Transversal Front Axle Locking”, or “Front Differential Lock” depending on the translation website used.

VW marketing who are not engineers & don’t talk to the engineering/mechanical depts. refer to it in the sales brochures as a “mechanical limited slip differential”. Unfortunately it is NOT a “mechanical limited slip differential”, & this has been the sole cause of huge amounts of misinformation & misunderstanding, all because they decided to “simplify & up-sell” the unit, thank you VW’s marketing dept.!

I prefer to call it by the shorter anacronyms of the correct name e.g. VAQ, FXD, or FDL.
 

golfdave

Drag Racing Champion
Location
Scotland (U.K.)
Ride
MK7 Golf GT Estate
Part II

What is the problem with a basic “open” differential (simple description)?
When you go around a corner the inner wheel wants to spin & lose grip as the load/weight transfer is to the outside wheel. This causes more understeer, where you continue straight on, i.e. take a bigger & wider corner than the steering input.
All Golf’s, like most cars have an "open" diff in the gearbox case, which can't fully transfer the wasted torque from the inside wheel to the outside wheel which requires it, due to it having more grip. Thus engine torque is wasted & "spun away” on the weaker inside wheel due to less tyre/road grip from it.

How does the FDL work? (simple description).
The FDL activates when an ABS sensor identifies a spinning front wheel (inside wheel when cornering). The FDL unit increases the pump speed to pump oil to push the piston which compresses the clutch pack & activates the FDL. The amount of pressure on the clutch pack affects the transfer of torque from the spinning inner wheel to the driven outer wheel. Thus torque acting on the spinning inner wheel is reduced & applied to the driven outer wheel, thus reducing or eliminating understeer & providing better cornering & control.

What is it actually?
The easy answer given by many people is:- “its’ a modified Haldex unit as fitted to the MK7 Golf “R” AWD”. Unfortunately this is too simple & the unit has been modified so much its very different to the AWD unit, in parts & also in function!

The unit used for the AWD systems is very simple, as it only has to transfer drive/torque from the single input end (prop shaft from gearbox), through the clutch pack, to the single output end (to final drive unit which splits the drive to both rear wheels).
The FDL unit is placed on the right side (passenger NAR/Europe, drivers UK/Aus) drive shaft just after the gearbox case. It can only be here as it has to locate onto the existing “open” differential cage, which is on the right side of the final/spur gear in the existing gearbox case!

The FDL unit has to allow drive/torque to transfer straight through it to the wheel on that side (passenger NAR etc) when the unit is inactive. However when the unit is active (clutch’s compressed) the unit has to be able to transfer part of the drive/torque back to the “open” diff in the gearbox case. Effectively doing a “u” turn of 180deg inside the unit for 1% to 100% of the drive/torque whilst at the same time still allowing the rest of the drive/torque to go through the unit to the wheel on that side (passenger NAR etc), i.e. drive from one end, but output to both ends at same time. So fairly complex then!

What are the actual differences between this & the AWD unit fitted to the “R” etc.?
What is the same:-
Generation V Haldex coupling pump
Pressure relief valve which opens at 44bar
The working piston
The clutch pack

What is unique to the FDL:-
The flanged driveshaft, which goes through the whole unit from the gearbox end to the passenger (NAR) wheel end flange.
The hollow shaft, with the clutch “basket” which the above shaft goes through.
The bleed container, to remove air from the Haldex oil. I assume this is because the oil in this situation could “aerate” do to the increased operation & reaction time compared to the AWD system.
 

Attachments

golfdave

Drag Racing Champion
Location
Scotland (U.K.)
Ride
MK7 Golf GT Estate
Part III

How does it the FDL work? (technical & mechanical description).
The existing open diff in the gearbox is standard & has the bevel gears (planet & sun) within a cage. The cage is bolted to the main final drive/spur gear from the gearbox. This is one solid unit & rotates together. The stub drive shaft for the driver’s side (NAR/Europe) flange passes through the final main gear & connects to its bevel sun gear within the cage. So far, exactly like all other MK7 Golfs, & standard for an “open” diff.

Now the complex bits. The stub/flanged driveshaft for the passenger side (NAR/Europe) is connected to its own bevel sun gear within the open diff cage. It exits the cage via a new tube, then passes into the FDL unit through it’s main hollow shaft, the clutch pack basket, the piston, & then connects to the flange on the passenger side of the FDL unit. The open diff cage tube in the gearbox has a notched/splined end where the driveshaft passes through into the FDL unit. The hollow shaft in the FDL unit is notched on the inside & fits over the notched end on the diff cage tube, thus both are locked together in place.

In normal inactive mode the clutch pack is disengaged. Say the NAR drivers side wheel is rotating with the open diff cage/final drive gear & also the hollow shaft in the FDL unit. The driveshaft from the gearbox & through the FDL unit to the wheel on the passenger side can be rotating at a different speed due to the % effect of the bevel gears inside the cage (whole point of a diff).

When the unit activates, the clutch pack will lock from 0% to 100%. The control module activates the pump, pumping oil into the housing where the "piston" is & compressing the clutch pack plates together at high pressure. The exact details of what bits of the clutch are locked to, what are free to rotate, etc., is limited in the public sphere. However from the VW tech guides:- “The flange shaft is connected to the hub & the inner plates by splines” – “The hollow shaft & the plate carrier are one component & the hollow shaft is connected to the outer plates”.

EDIT 10th March 2018:-
I have had huge problems if finding out the correct info as you can have three different ways to stack the clutch plates in the basket. The following is now correct:-

I am 100% certain now that the clutch pack is like the DSG & AWD clutch pack. The driveshaft actually has a "hub" on it. In fact this is just a piece of metal which locks onto the driveshaft & makes the driveshaft thicker in the clutch pack. This enables more clutch plate locating slots & thus more torque to be transferred to the driveshaft as the effective circumference has been increased. The clutch plates have two type/shapes of disc (actually a ring), each one alternating with the other in the stack. So one clutch ring has a smooth bigger inner opening to clear the driveshaft/hub, but with tabs which stick out on the outer edge to locate into the basket (outer plate). The other type of ring has a narrow inner opening with tabs on this edge to locate onto the slots on the hub. The outer edge of this ring is smooth & smaller than the other ring to clear the inside of the basket (inner plate). End of EDIT

The slots on the hub & the clutch basket allow the respective clutch rings to slide along the hub & the basket/carrier, whilst still being locked rotationally to their respective parts.

The pump, pumps oil to the piston, which moves towards the gearbox, thus compressing the clutch rings against each other towards the gearbox end of the clutch “basket”. As the friction builds up between rings, the whole clutch pack starts to “lock up”. Thus making the driveshaft, hub, clutch, & hollow shaft, “locked” together & therefore “locked” with the diff cage. This effectively "locks" the passenger side (NAR/Europe) "sun" gear to the diff cage & therefore "locks" the “open” diff up, & thus the driver’s side wheel. Now you have a “solid front axle” with the engine torque being transferred to both front wheels no matter if one is up in the air with no grip.

What about the “preload” problem?
One of the disadvantages of some LSD’s is that they require a small amount of mechanical force/torque imbalance to overcome the internal resistance in the LSD unit & start the “lock up” & transfer of torque to the wheel with the most grip. Most modern LSD units get around this with various “bump wave” cogs/ramps, or by altering the end friction plates or the gear oil “W” rating.

The FDL unit is supposed to not have this problem as its an electrohydraulic clutch pack diff lock. Unfortunately it has a “preload” type problem & has to use the existing XDS brake based system in certain limited conditions.

Ultimately the FDL unit has no direct mechanical way of activating the clutches, so in effect it has a huge “pre-load” problem. The FDL cannot “sense” torque through the drive shafts & thus cannot use this to activate the pump to activate the clutch’s. It has to be “told” what the wheel speed is from the external ABS sensors as it does not have its own sensors. Therefore even if you leave the FDL unit powered but disconnect it from the CAN bus or just the ABS unit, it will not work as it is not a “stand alone” unit, & thus NOT a mechanical LSD!
 

Attachments

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golfdave

Drag Racing Champion
Location
Scotland (U.K.)
Ride
MK7 Golf GT Estate
Part IV

How does the FDL work electrically?
The unit has an electric pump, to pump the oil & a control module (PCB). However it relies heavily on data from the other existing electrical systems to decide to activate or not, as it does not have its own sensors.

The FDL electronic module is called “J647” & controls the FDL pump (V181). Using the “Running gear” CAN bus, it talks directly to:-
J104, ABS (& XDS/ESC) control unit, sensors:-
G44, G45, G46, G47 (ABS wheel sensors),
G200 (lateral acceleration sender),
G202 (Yaw rate sender),
G251 (longitudinal acceleration sender).
J500, Power steering control unit, sensors:-
G85 (steering angle sender).

It also talks directly to the main CAN data bus interface & receives additional information from the following:-
J743, Mechatronic unit for the DSG gearbox (if fitted)
J623, Engine control unit, sensors:-
G28 (engine speed),
G79 (accelerator position sender),
G476 (Clutch position sender)
J285, Control unit in dash, Parking brake status.

The control module on the FDL (J647) makes the calculations & decisions as to activate or not activate the pump (V181) to pump the oil, to compress the clutches’ & thus activate the FDL. The first information that it requires is wheel speed data from the individual ABS sensors on each wheel hub (G44 to G47). If it notices that one front wheel is spinning it will look for other data to confirm, steering input (G85), accelerator position (G79), etc, etc. If the data confirms that the car requires the activation of the FDL unit it will activate the pump (V181) the required amount to activate the clutches enough to transfer the correct % of torque to the correct wheel.

If there is a failure in ANY of the listed control modules/sensors/senders it will NOT work, & go into a “safe” mode, i.e. inactive & you just have the existing “open” diff as per lesser Golf’s.
 

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golfdave

Drag Racing Champion
Location
Scotland (U.K.)
Ride
MK7 Golf GT Estate
Part V

Don’t the Seat & VW TCR race cars use the FDL unit?
Only the DSG gearbox versions of the Seat Leon & VW Golf TCR Race cars use the same FDL unit as MK7 Golf GTI “PP”. The cars fitted with the SADEV 6 speed sequential gearbox (SEQ) have their own clutch/ramp type mechanical LSD with sun & planet gears in place of the “open” diff in the gearbox. This SEQ LSD has an external adjustment screw for a “preload” setting, & you can get different “ramp” sets, again to alter the characteristics.

The “Electronic modules” specification lists the “ABS/ESP” unit as “Continental” (actually the MK100 unit), & “Software” for the unit as “Not active”. This proves that although the ABS unit is fitted, it is “inactive”. The reason for this is that the ABS unit is required as a “pass through” for sensors:- G44, G45, G46, G47 (ABS wheel sensors), G200 (lateral acceleration sender), G202 (Yaw rate sender), G251 (longitudinal acceleration sender), as the FDL unit requires the data from these to decide to activate or not! Without these is cannot work!

The “Electronic modules” specification also lists the DSG Mechatronic as “VW” with “Motorsports” software, & the FDL unit as “Borg Warner” with “Motorsports” software.

The 2015 Seat Leon Cup racer lists 3 switchable maps available in the control unit of the FDL unit.
Map 1:- Base mode, no over slip, only yaw damping above 110km/hr, 300Nm preload during braking. For high grip (new tyres).
Map 2:- Like map 1, less yaw damping, 200Nm preload during braking. Medium grip (used tyres).
Map 3:- Preload dependant on engine torque, 200Nm preload during braking (releasing earlier than Map 2). Low grip/rain.

Please note that this engine has a maximum specified torque of 410Nm, so the FDL unit is applying half, or more, of the engines torque figure as “preload” during braking.

Information on the 2016 & 2017 DSG cars is an incorrect cut & paste from the SEQ cars so no more info on the DSG & FDL unit. So it is assumed that the FDL unit is unchanged for these years as no other “revisions” on the DSG specs.

The revised 2017 TCR DSG race car servicing schedule for the DSG gearbox & FDL unit:-
FDL pump replaced every 4,000km.
DSG & FDL units serviced by Seat Sport at 4,000km (sprint race), 8,000km (endurance race).
DSG & FDL units changed (meaning replaced) by Seat Sport at 12,000km (sprint race), 14,000km (endurance race).

The Seat Leon Cup Racer TCR Race cars were launched only with the DSG & the FDL unit in 2015. Then from 2016 they offered the Sadev sequential gearbox with a mechanical LSD as an upgrade package or full new build. Quote from 2016 brochure:- “For the TCR series the car receives a new lighter & more individually adaptable transmission”. Basically the racers wanted a sequential gearbox & a mechanical LSD. Thus a lighter car (40kg less than DSG/FDL for 2017) & more adjustment to suit driver & total predictability of the LSD, compared to the DSG/FDL version. The DSG & FDL launch in the TCR race cars was effectively a PR exercise to “prove” you could track the DSG/FDL.
 
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golfdave

Drag Racing Champion
Location
Scotland (U.K.)
Ride
MK7 Golf GT Estate
Part VI

Do the XDS settings alter the FDL units response?
By altering the XDS settings you affect the FDL directly, why? XDS wants to intervene first in a situation, as it’s a safety based system using the ABS unit & brakes, & is used on all the MK7 Golf’s. The FDL unit is not a safety system as per the ABS unit, so it will take second place behind the ABS in terms of commands/intervention. The default factory settings in the ABS unit for the XDS intervention are usually set the same for all Golf’s whether they have the FDL unit or not, & to a high “nanny” setting! By using VCDS or similar you can adjust the XDS intervention to a lower/weaker setting. This will stop the XDS from intervening early, & will then allow the FDL unit to operate unhindered in this “range”. This should also result in the XDS activating less as it will sense it does not need to activate as the FDL is taking care of matters even though it is second in command so to speak.

Analogy:-
Think of it as trying to get a smooth transition between the XDS system intervening & the FDL system taking over. Much like designing a speaker crossover network. You want a smooth transition of sound between the individual speaker cones, tweeter, mid, bass.

Is it easy to retro fit the FDL unit?
No! You have to take apart your gearbox case to remove your existing open diff, remove the diff cage & fit the one with the “tube” which the FDL unit locks onto. Then you need to remove the seal on that side of the gearbox case & replace with the one to accept the FDL unit hollow shaft. Then fit the FDL unit & the respective shorter driveshaft on this side. Then you have to wire the unit (5 wires) to the car loom & carry out VCDS coding etc.

What about servicing etc. for the FDL unit?
Many VW dealers do not read the information that VAG HQ make available. This forum & others have numerous members who have gone to the dealers & asked about servicing the FDL unit, & have usually been given incorrect information or met with blank stares. Since 2013, in both the VW self study guides & official workshop repair manuals, it has clearly stated that:- “The oil should be changed every 3 years regardless of the mileage”. The total quantity of oil in the FDL unit is 570ml +/– 30ml, the “change” quantity is approximately 0.4lt.

The electric pump which pumps the oil has had numerous failures, across all VAG brands & both applications, (FDL & AWD) as it’s the same pump part. This pump made for the Gen.V Borg Warner units might have just had a bad manufacturing batch, or a more serious design issue. It appears to be costing about £350 to fix if out of warranty.
 
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golfdave

Drag Racing Champion
Location
Scotland (U.K.)
Ride
MK7 Golf GT Estate
Part VII

So is the FDL unit better than a LSD?
I have always said that the Performance pack (PP) on the GTI is worth the peanuts it costs. However I my opinion it does not fully meet what I call “Performance”, & the same applies to the CS & CSS versions also!

The brakes in the “PP” are “R” spec, but weight a ton & are still basic cast iron single piston fist callipers. Not exactly what I would call “performance” considering that VAG has previously fitted 4 pot Brembos to smaller, lighter & less powerful road cars (Seat Cupra’s) & in smaller discs sizes!! “Performance” is usually about reducing unsprung weight & looking for those marginal performance gains in speed & handling. The PP adds 31kg to 32kg extra weight, 11kg (excluding oil) is the FDL, the rest is the bigger “R” front & rear brakes. However buying a non ”PP” car & fitting the better, lighter, aftermarket stuff will lighten your wallet considerably!!

The FDL unit adds weight (11kg without oil), & complexity to the drivetrain. By the nature of its design it is totally unpredictable. It will not repeatedly react the same if you drive around the same corner at the same speed with the same weather conditions. This is because it takes in data NOT from the torque acting on the driveshafts to the FDL unit or the open diff, but from numerous other sources (see section on “How does the FDL work electrically?”).

An Automotive Engineering thesis was conducted in conjunction with Borg Warner AB in Sweden in 2016. The aim was to develop real world driving scenarios on a test rig so that accurate computer algorithms can be made. Basically instead of having to spend weeks sliding around a test track to get real world data, stick the car on a test rig, like suspension design etc. has done (to an extent). They did various driveline set ups that the Borg Warner Gen.V unit is used for (AWD, FDL, hang on front, transfer case etc). Unfortunately they hit problems with the FDL (FXD) set up, Quote:- “The FXD system is the most difficult to recreate due to extreme variations in driveline behaviour.”. Basically the unit in this configuration is very “reactive” but also “proactive” i.e. react before. The driveline was oscillating like mad, as the unit tried to figure out which wheel to send the torque to! This resulted in huge differences in the recorded torque & angular velocities. This is all because it takes data from many sources, so is constantly adjusting, more so than in the other configurations & backs up my reasoning as to why they added a “bleed container” to remove air from the oil due to aeration.

So the FDL is useless & a LSD is way better then?
The FDL can talk to the other electrical systems as previously mentioned, & thus can react way quicker & in a finer & more precise way than a mechanical LSD can only dream of.

However an LSD is lighter, & best for predictable, reliable, long term hard usage. These units replace the existing “open” diff in the gearbox case, so use the same gearbox oil. No other special oils to get, just drain the gearbox as & when required. No expensive control modules, or pumps to fail. No chance of it going in to a “safe inactive” mode due to no communication with any other module or sensor that it relies upon.

Horses for courses, take your pick & pays your money, etc., etc..:cool:
 
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adam1991

Banned
Location
USA
Bravo. This is an amazing piece of work on a volunteer basis.

Now, to be fair to the marketing and sales types:

When you go around a corner the inner wheel wants to spin & lose grip...

The FDL activates when an ABS sensor identifies a spinning front wheel (inside wheel when cornering)....Thus torque acting on the spinning inner wheel is reduced & applied to the driven outer wheel...
what you describe is in fact a system that is limiting slip and reapportioning torque. All I can say is, they're marketing and sales guys. Some gearheads will print your article out in wide format and hang it on the wall for reference, but most just need something simple to grab onto. That they call it "LSD" is forgivable.
 

golfdave

Drag Racing Champion
Location
Scotland (U.K.)
Ride
MK7 Golf GT Estate
Bravo. This is an amazing piece of work on a volunteer basis.

Now, to be fair to the marketing and sales types:



what you describe is in fact a system that is limiting slip and reapportioning torque. All I can say is, they're marketing and sales guys. Some gearheads will print your article out in wide format and hang it on the wall for reference, but most just need something simple to grab onto. That they call it "LSD" is forgivable.
Thanks....

& yes in many arguments that I have had where people want to describe the FDL as an LSD as per your suggestion...then XDS & EDL & the other ABS system "difflocks" should then be also classed as an LSD, (however I do not class these as such).

However from a mechanical engineering point of view (mine) the term "Limited Slip Differential" has been around for decades & actually means a specific mechanical piece of kit...that's the trouble they (VW marketing) are taking an existing term & mis-using it...

By this definition the FDL is not a "mechanical limited slip differential" as it cannot sense torque & cannot act on its own to distribute the torque, unlike an LSD.

Therefore you easily argue that VW are misleading in their description in the sale brochures...the fact the maker & VW engineering call it by the correct terms also amplifies the stupidity of the marketing dept...

Anyway it's just nice to get the correct info out there...finally!! :cool:
 

golfdave

Drag Racing Champion
Location
Scotland (U.K.)
Ride
MK7 Golf GT Estate
Thanks for the pictures.. I'd be lost without them lol
I know...:D

I had to re-jig the VW ones to get then to correctly show certain things & the big one I have done the multi coloured overlay on ....not 100% happy with it...:mad:

I need to work on it to get it way neater & clearer...this one will do for the moment though...;)
 

adam1991

Banned
Location
USA
If you could put this all together into a document in some fashion, I would indeed format and print it out wide format suitable for putting on the wall in the dealership, and I would hand a couple copies to my dealership. The new car manager, at any rate, is an enthusiast with his own GTI.

I could just grab the text and photos, I guess, and work it from there. I'm at home sick today; that's what I'll play with.

Think of how you want the copyright notice to read.
 

golfdave

Drag Racing Champion
Location
Scotland (U.K.)
Ride
MK7 Golf GT Estate
If you could put this all together into a document in some fashion, I would indeed format and print it out wide format suitable for putting on the wall in the dealership, and I would hand a couple copies to my dealership. The new car manager, at any rate, is an enthusiast with his own GTI.

I could just grab the text and photos, I guess, and work it from there. I'm at home sick today; that's what I'll play with.

Think of how you want the copyright notice to read.
Seriously??..wow...:)

Listen let me firstly sort the multi colour pic as not 100% happy with it....

Then I will be able to make a PDF report on it & upload it to dropbox....

Copyright...I used info out there, so I just need to do the Acknowledgement better...just add my name as the collator & interpreter of the report...
 

ucfquattroguy

Ready to race!
Location
Florida USA
Great write-up. While the "Performance" part of the package doesn't align with what you would want for a track car or a 100% no-compromises setup, many forget that an OEM's priorities are different then if you were piecing together a laundry list of upgrades for your own car. OEM's have to worry about things like cost across the fleet for production, etc in addition to actually adding some marginal amount of "performance".

Yes, the brakes are heavy. But, larger rotor means the caliper is farther from the hub which means greater effective torque can be applied. The added power isn't really beneficial unless you are running sticky R-Compound tires, but the additional size will help dealing with heat during repeated stops. Higher resistance to fade, etc assuming you aren't running a garbage brake pad.

Yes, the VAQ adds complexity and a bit of weight. But, again...the OEM is operating under the assumption that 99.9% of cars bought will remain equipped as-is. While there are some nuances in learning how to get the most from the VAQ, it's a great tool to increase the amount of work the front-end of the car is able to do. I've never been a fan of brake-based slip limitation (it's nothing more than a band-aid and is using brakes for something other than braking). But, using the brakes here as a form of pre-load is a win/win situation. Having had mechanical clutch-plate LSDs in previous cars, I know about the compromise that needs to be made with static pre-load. Too much, and turn-in suffers because your left/right sides are resisting differentiation. Too little, and your locking progression becomes an on/off switch and can be unpredictable in low-grip situations. Also, with VCDS or OBDEleven, you can change the locking adaptation channel to what we believe is the factory setting for the Clubsport S cars. Increased lockup (when needed) and what feels like a quicker reaction. Really took it to another level.
 
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adam1991

Banned
Location
USA
Great write-up. While the "Performance" part of the package doesn't align with what you would want for a track car or a 100% no-compromises setup, many forget that an OEM's priorities are different then if you were piecing together a laundry list of upgrades for your own car. OEM's have to worry about things like cost across the fleet for production, etc in addition to actually adding some marginal amount of "performance".
Plus satisfying the bell curve average driver who uses it daily for commuting and basic activities, plus--not to be ignored--potential warranty costs.
 

golfdave

Drag Racing Champion
Location
Scotland (U.K.)
Ride
MK7 Golf GT Estate
Great write-up. While the "Performance" part of the package doesn't align with what you would want for a track car or a 100% no-compromises setup, many forget that an OEM's priorities are different then if you were piecing together a laundry list of upgrades for your own car. OEM's have to worry about things like cost across the fleet for production, etc in addition to actually adding some marginal amount of "performance".
Plus satisfying the bell curve average driver who uses it daily for commuting and basic activities, plus--not to be ignored--potential warranty costs.
Agree that the companies just try to "up-sell" an "add-on" which is re-used parts from another car...

Just from my OCD mechanical, logical, mind it makes me want to scream as in no way does it satisfy the terms "performance package" ........:mad:

But VW marketing created huge mis-information by calling it (FXD/VAQ/FDL) in the sales brochure "mechanical limited slip diff"...

As the "in thing" is electronic whizz-bangs why not call it by it's real name....they refer to the "R " as having "4motion all wheel drive".....thank god few people remember the older "4mo" Passat which was actually "Quattro"........:D
 

Obsrvr

Ready to race!
Location
USA
Very thorough and helpful posts by the OP. Now all I gotta do is read it about 100 more times to pick up the "finer points"! :D
 

ITGUY

Go Kart Champion
Location
PA
Soooo.. is it just worth getting a Wavetech then instead of going through the trouble of this upgrade??
 

golfdave

Drag Racing Champion
Location
Scotland (U.K.)
Ride
MK7 Golf GT Estate
Soooo.. is it just worth getting a Wavetech then instead of going through the trouble of this upgrade??
If you swap your cars ever few years the PP option is worth the peanuts it costs..always stated that..

However if you have a non PP or keep your cars long term & wish to do your own servicing & have as few electrics to fail then fit the Wavetrak...
 
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