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CRBC Engine HPFP reliability?

davegsm82

Go Kart Newbie
Location
Blyth, Northumberland - England
Car(s)
MK7 Golf and T3 Tdi
I'm new to the MK7 platform and the CRBC engine, after a recent LPFP failure I started reading up about HPFP's disintegrating and killing the injectors etc but it's left me confused.

I saw lots of threads about CP3 pump retrofitting, and have seen kits for sale etc. I also saw threads about fitting alternative feeds to the metering valve on the CP4.1 to prevent it killing the injectors when the pump roller disintegrates.

However all the threads seem to just taper off to nothing, there never seems to be any conclusion or folks following up with experiences of modifications.

What's going on? has the CP4.1 reliability issue gone away? has VW extended it's warranty to cover the pump or something? someone please help me out here as I'm kind of lost and my 164K engine feels like a bit of a ticking timebomb.
 

PRRGG1

Go Kart Champion
Location
USA
I'm not a diesel expert, but we drove our 2010 TDI Sportwagen (U.S.) for 115K Miles, using Stanadyne Lubricity Additive with every tank. We had a 2nd Gen HPFP in ours and we never had any trouble whatsoever. From what I remember, the Gen3 pump in yours was even more robust and very reliable. I'm surprised that owners are having problems with the CP3 and CP4. A portion of U.S. HPFP failures stemmed from diesel newbies filling their cars with gasoline. VW later modified the filler neck so that gasoline nozzles couldn't be inserted.

We sold our TDI when VW worked its buyback process after the diesel emissions mess. We loved our TDI, but the buyback offer was too good to turn down.
 

jimlloyd40

Autocross Champion
Location
Phoenix
Car(s)
2018 SE DSG
I would check with your dealer. A friend of mine had a 2011 TDI and the pump exploded and it was covered out of warranty because it was a known problem.
It didn't cost her anything but the dealer gave her the invoice marked no charge and it was over $8000 to repair.
 

PRRGG1

Go Kart Champion
Location
USA
I recall reading similar outcomes Jim. So the story goes, VW Dealers would take a fuel sample into a styrofoam cup. If the cup began to melt and sag, it was an indicator that gasoline was in the fuel and that the Owner might be on the hook for repair costs.

Despite our perfect fuel pump record, I did worry with it because a failure was so horrifically expensive. But it was the DPF that gave me the most anxiety. Ours clogged at about 80K miles with a $2,000 replacement cost, avoided only because I brought to the Dealer's attention that it was an emissions component covered by warranty. I figured we'd bear this expense the next time and that cost was in the arithmetic when we chose to sell the car back to VW.
 

davegsm82

Go Kart Newbie
Location
Blyth, Northumberland - England
Car(s)
MK7 Golf and T3 Tdi
@PRRGG1 - everything I've read simply points to VW/Bosch cheaping out on the CP4.1, it's a single cylinder piston pump, whereas the CP3 was actually a 3-cylinder pump in a radial configuration.

The CP3 is larger and can flow a lot more, it's used in aplications such as the 1.4HDi engine fitted to Peugeot/Citroen/Ford's in the early 2000's which are a blistering 68BHP and people are retrofitting them to 6.8L Duramax engines so they are definitely capable.

If anyone has had experience with the dealers in the UK and this particular problem then I'd like to hear from you. Istill have no idea why the CP3 retrofit threads seem to have just gone dark...

Cheers, Dave.
 

PRRGG1

Go Kart Champion
Location
USA
VERY interesting in the pump cheapening Dave -- I didn't know of that. Good luck in your quest. (y)
 
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