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Consolidated Macan Brembo upgrade thread (READ FIRST POST)

GTIfan99

Autocross Champion
Location
FL
Thoughts on this Nuespeed kit for $1,049.95?
  • Kit Includes:​

    • 1x Left 345x30mm Full-Floating 2-Piece Slotted Rotor
    • 1x Right 345x30mm Full-Floating 2-Piece Slotted Rotor
    • 1x Set of NEUSPEED Stainless Steel Sport Brake Lines
    • 1x Set of iSweep Performance Brake Pads
    • 1x Set of NEUSPEED Grade 5 Titanium Brake Pad Shims

It looks like a nice setup.
 

DjDvr

New member
Location
Ro
Car(s)
A3
No.



No.



Yes.



Bleed properly, use red rubber grease, and do the OBD11 changes outlined in the first or second post and you won't have a soft pedal with a long travel distance.
Hey , I keep reading about using the red rubber grease, but why exactly ? Or where exactly ? Oem install does not use the grease on Q5/Macan as far as I can see (I may be wrong). Asking as I had my Q5 setup ordered and curios what this step actually is as a lot of people seem to recommend this

Cheers.
 

GTIfan99

Autocross Champion
Location
FL
Hey , I keep reading about using the red rubber grease, but why exactly ? Or where exactly ? Oem install does not use the grease on Q5/Macan as far as I can see (I may be wrong). Asking as I had my Q5 setup ordered and curios what this step actually is as a lot of people seem to recommend this

Cheers.

It's Castrol Red Rubber grease.

It reduces retraction and improves feel.
 
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turbojzrr

Go Kart Champion
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
Car(s)
'19 Golf R
It’s really easy to over analyze this given the 165 pages of content. If you are looking for perfection, get something else prepackaged. This is 95% there iMHO for half the price

I didn’t do the grease, just with a good pad like R4s, you will get really good street pedal feel if properly bed. For me, R4 race pads are spongy, but never fades over 2 very hard sessions at laguna seca.

pads affect pedal feel often more than even the caliper. I’m really happy with this setup at this time.
 

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tigeo

Autocross Champion
"Stopping better" has got to be better defined. There's stopping distance when cold, when hot, resistance to overheating/boiling, pedal firmness, consistency, and more.

Under most street conditions, almost any braking system ought to be able to engage ABS. Under those conditions, it is the tire, not the brake system, that limits braking distance. If you haven't engaged ABS, then you haven't met your brake system's limits. And then there is pad material, with different coefficients of friction and optimal temperature ranges. A trackpad is less effective when it's cold but can be very sensitive when hot and vice versa for street pads. IMO, pad material and operating temperature affects feel more than caliper design. A pad material with good coefficient of friction at your operating temps should give a good feel.

Pedal travel has a different set of influencers.
- As discussed before, a surprising one is whether a caliper keeps its pads in close contact with the rotor. From what I've seen, our PP rear calipers do a good job of that with their relatively stiff springs and the ratcheting effect of the hand brake (if that's how that works). And this is why people recommend red grease for Macan calipers - so that piston seal stiction does not slightly retract the pads after every brake application. I've seen cases where the pads can be slightly wiggled back and forth between the caliper pistons and rotor. That will cause pedal travel.
- Another influencer is aged brake fluid - not aged in time but in temperature. Heat degrades fluid even before boiling. In track conditions, flushing the calipers periodically helps.
- And one more possibility is brake hose material. Some upgrade to stainless steel hoses but I'm not convinced this makes much difference in pedal travel/feel.

To me, the benefits of aftermarket calipers, whether Macan or others, are applicable to track use: a wider selection of pad material, more resistance to over heating fluid, lower weight. I'm not at all convinced there's any perceptible difference for street use.

Bern
Bingo! Here is some nice data supporting this....APR BBK (350x34) on my Sportwagen 60-0 panic stop, same basic conditions, road, temps, pad type, tires, etc. Call it a wash in stopping distance with the 1' difference falling in the range of measuring error/conditions/etc. Large brakes are for consistency and heat management over repeated use. Before graph is the 312mm setup I had (based GTI/Alltrack) with EBC Yellowstuff pads, ss lines, slotted rotors, RBF600 fluid, RS3 ducts. After is the APR BBK with their hybrid street/track pad, RS3 ducts, and RBF600 fluid.

312 vs BBK.JPG
 

DjDvr

New member
Location
Ro
Car(s)
A3
It's Castrol Red Rubber grease.

It reduces retraction and improves feel.
ok thank you for the reply. But then why would this be a problem only in PQ35/MQB style cars ? The MC cannot be the cause as that would not make any difference there and Q5/Macans would surely not have this problem. I don't want to create any fuss , order mine already so to late for anything :), just wondering if I should or should not do it as well :).
Currently thinking of doing a good bleed + bedding and seeing after that if it needs anything else.
 

GTIfan99

Autocross Champion
Location
FL
ok thank you for the reply. But then why would this be a problem only in PQ35/MQB style cars ? The MC cannot be the cause as that would not make any difference there and Q5/Macans would surely not have this problem. I don't want to create any fuss , order mine already so to late for anything :), just wondering if I should or should not do it as well :).
Currently thinking of doing a good bleed + bedding and seeing after that if it needs anything else.

I doubt the abs module and MC are the same for the Macan and GTI, so I'm not sure what the confusion is.

A member measured retraction with and without RRG. It cuts retraction in half.

Do it, don't do it, you should be fine either way, but it will give you better pedal feel.
 
Last edited:

Martin2411

New member
Location
SVK
Car(s)
Golf mk7.5r
So did change today, i have long travel pedal problem so im gonna bleed the brakes tomorow as well, on the macan caliper there are 2bleaders one out and one inside which one to bleed first or how to bleed it ? Is it possible to bleed brakes via 2person procedure ? One is pushing the pedal and one is bleeding ?Or its not safe way to do it. My brake pedal is soft at top like one inch and after that they bite really good but much more brake travel than oem pedal. Thanks for help
 

GTIfan99

Autocross Champion
Location
FL
So did change today, i have long travel pedal problem so im gonna bleed the brakes tomorow as well, on the macan caliper there are 2bleaders one out and one inside which one to bleed first or how to bleed it ? Is it possible to bleed brakes via 2person procedure ? One is pushing the pedal and one is bleeding ?Or its not safe way to do it. My brake pedal is soft at top like one inch and after that they bite really good but much more brake travel than oem pedal. Thanks for help

What psi did you bleed them? Did you use RRG?

I swear, it feels like you didn't fully read the first post, then just post.

30 psi bleed is required by the VW manual.

RRG will significantly reduce retraction.
 

Martin2411

New member
Location
SVK
Car(s)
Golf mk7.5r
Shop done it for me so not sure, can you please tell me hot to bleed front brakes which have 2 nipples to bleed ? What is the right way to do it ? Thanks
 

GTIfan99

Autocross Champion
Location
FL
Shop done it for me so not sure, can you please tell me hot to bleed front brakes which have 2 nipples to bleed ? What is the right way to do it ? Thanks

Inside, then outside. You need a Motive bleeder.

Also, they likely didn't bleed the rear. They absolutely need to be bled too.
 

MrFancypants

Autocross Champion
Location
Ho,e
Car(s)
GTI
What psi did you bleed them? Did you use RRG?

I swear, it feels like you didn't fully read the first post, then just post.

30 psi bleed is required by the VW manual.

RRG will significantly reduce retraction.
Is there something special about these specific calipers that require a pressure bleed? I’ve never applied positive pressure to my brake system and have never had an issue.

You think maybe some people aren’t securing the brake pedal by forcing it to stay “down” before they open the hydraulics and the lines are running dry? Getting a bubble stuck in the master cylinder or somewhere in the ABS pump can cause excessive pedal travel and/or spongy pedal feel.
 

GTIfan99

Autocross Champion
Location
FL
Is there something special about these specific calipers that require a pressure bleed? I’ve never applied positive pressure to my brake system and have never had an issue.

You think maybe some people aren’t securing the brake pedal by forcing it to stay “down” before they open the hydraulics and the lines are running dry? Getting a bubble stuck in the master cylinder or somewhere in the ABS pump can cause excessive pedal travel and/or spongy pedal feel.

VW calls for 30 psi for the PP brakes and these seem harder to bleed from the experience in this thread and my personal experience.

Also, if you're doing it yourself, you tend to be more careful. Having a shop do it, you never know what you're going to get.

They likely didn't keep brake depressed and didn't bleed the rears. You're going to get a really soft pedal.
 

Martin2411

New member
Location
SVK
Car(s)
Golf mk7.5r
Did the bleeding yesterday 30psi pressure LF RF LR RR i soend more than one liter of break fluid flush it and everything. Still the exactly same feel , i mean its not bad but it takes 0,5inch to start feeling the brake and than it brakes fenomenal, When u pish it hard its better than oem 100% but on oem brakes you can feel them braking right when u touch break pedal, thisone take 0,5inch +/-.
When u have car in sport and brake hard car is downshifting harder with this braks which i like to be honest because car thinks ur breaking harder/pushing kore pedal.
 
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